Back to top anchor
Working paper

Modelling the Effect of Population Ageing on Government Social Expenditures (WP 03/15)

Issue date: 
Sunday, 1 June 2003
Status: 
Current
Author: 
View point: 
Publication category: 
JEL classification: 
D72 - Political Processes: Rent-seeking, Lobbying, Elections, Legislatures, and Voting Behavior
E62 - Fiscal Policy
J11 - Demographic Trends, Macroeconomic Effects, and Forecasts

Formats and related files

This paper reviews and extends a new framework, developed by Razin, Sadka, and Swagel, for capturing the effect of population ageing on public support for government social expenditures.

Abstract

This paper reviews and extends a new framework, developed by Razin, Sadka, and Swagel, for capturing the effect of population ageing on public support for government social expenditures. Razin et al construct up an overlapping generations, median voter model, and investigate the empirical applicability of the model using panel data from 13 OECD countries. Their results suggest that population ageing will put downward pressure on per capita expenditures. These results rest, however, on an assumption that there is only one dependant age group: the old. This paper investigates the consequences of allowing for two such age groups: the young and the old. A replication of Razin et al’s empirical analysis, using two dependent age groups rather than one, suggests that population ageing will instead put upward pressure on per capita expenditures. Although these results are tentative, they illustrate the usefulness of including both youth dependency and old-age dependency in Razin et al’s framework.

Acknowledgements

Data for the analysis was generously supplied by Assaf Razin and Phillip Swagel. John Creedy, Dean Hyslop, Assaf Razin, and colleagues in Policy Coordination and Development provided invaluable comments on earlier versions of the paper.

Disclaimer

The views expressed in this Working Paper are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of the New Zealand Treasury. The paper is presented not as policy, but with a view to inform and stimulate wider debate.

Last updated: 
Wednesday, 24 October 2007