Commissioned report

Exploring the Links between Quality Improvement Strategies and Organisational Outcomes in Four New Zealand District Health Boards: Final Report

In April 2016 the Treasury released a report prepared by the Ministry of Health, the Treasury, and the Health Quality & Safety Commission.

This publication reports on the results of a project initiated by three New Zealand government agencies in 2015. The project aimed to examine the links between quality improvement strategies implemented by New Zealand district health boards (DHBs) and their organisational outcomes.

A number of DHBs are using quality frameworks and concepts as core elements of their organisational strategies to improve patient outcomes and manage healthcare costs. The successes and challenges of these strategies can provide useful insights for other DHBs and the broader health system.

The project was undertaken by the Ministry of Health, the Treasury and the Health Quality & Safety Commission in collaboration with the Auckland, Bay of Plenty, Canterbury and Whanganui DHBs. These DHBs provide a real-life example of what customer-centric models of care look like in practice. Elements that contributed to the success of programmes in these DHBs are relevant to other services delivered by the Government. The report is an example of how collaboration between policy and operational organisations can provide useful lessons for evaluating existing programmes and developing new initiatives.

Prepared by the Ministry of Health, the Treasury, and the Health Quality & Safety Commission.

This publication reports on the results of a project initiated by three New Zealand government agencies in 2015. The project aimed to examine the links between quality improvement strategies implemented by New Zealand district health boards (DHBs) and their organisational outcomes.

A number of DHBs are using quality frameworks and concepts as core elements of their organisational strategies to improve patient outcomes and manage healthcare costs. The successes and challenges of these strategies can provide useful insights for other DHBs and the broader health system.

The project was undertaken by the Ministry of Health, the Treasury and the Health Quality & Safety Commission in collaboration with the Auckland, Bay of Plenty, Canterbury and Whanganui DHBs. These DHBs provide a real-life example of what customer-centric models of care look like in practice. Elements that contributed to the success of programmes in these DHBs are relevant to other services delivered by the Government. The report is an example of how collaboration between policy and operational organisations can provide useful lessons for evaluating existing programmes and developing new initiatives.