The Treasury

Global Navigation

Personal tools

You are here: Home > Publications > Media Statements, Speeches and Guest Lectures > Guest Lectures by Visiting Academics > Guest Lecturers: Maui Hudson, Kirikowhai Mikaere & Andrew Sporle - Data and Development: Maori Interests in the Data Ecosystem

 

Guest Lecturers: Maui Hudson, Kirikowhai Mikaere & Andrew Sporle - Data and Development: Maori Interests in the Data Ecosystem

Page updated Dec 20, 2016

Event Details

Documents

Presentation material for Maui Hudson, Kirikowhai Mikaere and Andrew Sporle's lecture presented at the Treasury on 12 December 2016.

Abstract

The rapid development of New Zealand's official data infrastructure presents both opportunities and challenges to Māori development. Māori have expressed concerns that these data innovations are occurring in the absence of a robust Māori data governance partnership that is representative, enabling, and provides clear lines of accountability back to Māori/Iwi.

Te Mana Raraunga, the Māori Data Sovereignty Network, and the Iwi Leaders Data Working Group have been active in discussions about the role of Māori in the data ecosystem.  This country’s world leading data resources present a historic opportunity to apply high quality data and robust analysis to inform Māori development at a national and local level. Achieving this will require active engagement to ensure that confidence in the data system is reinforced and that Māori development needs are incorporated into the design and function of the data ecosystem. In the age of big data, Māori want access to data to support their own decision‐making and to be involved when big data is used to make decisions about them.

This presentation will outline how data might best contribute to Māori development and how Māori interests in data could be recognised.

About Kirikowhai Mikaere

Kirikowhai Mikaere (Tuhourangi, Ngāti Whakaue) is a self-employed contractor advising different Māori and Iwi organisations on their statistical and information needs including the use of data to inform tribal development and service delivery. In a former life Kirikowhai was a senior advisor to the Government Statistician and Private Secretary Statistics to the Minister of Statistics in New Zealand. She is a technical advisor to the Iwi (Tribal) Chairs Forum - Data Leadership Group and a founding member of Te Mana Raraunga, the Māori Data Sovereignty Network.

About Maui Hudson

Maui Hudson (Te Whakatohea, Nga Ruahine, Te Mahurehure) is a member of the Whakatohea Māori Trust Board and Director on two of its companies, Te Pou Oranga o Whakatohea, and Eastern Seafarms Ltd. Maui is an Associate Professor in the Faculty of Māori and Indigenous Studies at the University of Waikato.  His research is interdisciplinary in nature focusing on the application of mātauranga Māori to decision-making across a range of contexts from new technologies to health, the environment to innovation. Access to data and governance of data are key issues emerging from his research and his involvement in Te Mana Raraunga, the Māori Data Sovereignty Network.

About Andrew Sporle

Andrew Sporle (Ngati Apa, Rangitane, Te Rarawa) is based part-time in the Statistics Department at the University of Auckland, where he teaches in courses on survey methods, official statistics and statistical literacy. He works primarily as a consultant, with over two decades experience developing initiatives in Māori research, research workforce development and official statistics research in the public, private and academic sectors. His current research interests include improving the Māori responsiveness of mainstream research, creating statistically robust longitudinal studies with existing data as well as the development of public domain tools to improve the accessibility and utility of official statistics. He is a founding member of Te Mana Rauranga.

Note: Papers, presentation slides and any other material provided by the Guest Lecturer will be made available some time after the lecture at Publications > Media & Speeches > Guest Lectures by Visiting Academics.