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Guest Lecture: Professor Mark HenaghanChild Abuse, Child Poverty, Genetic Medicine and The Treasury

Page updated 20 Sep 2007

Abstract and paper from Professor Mark Henaghan's Guest Lecture presented at the Treasury on 01 November 2005.

Professor Mark Henaghan

University of Otago

Mark Henaghan is Dean and Professor of Law at the University of Otago, specialising in Family Law and a Barrister and Solicitor of the High Court of New Zealand.

Professor Henaghan is an author and member of the Editorial Board for Butterworth's Family Law Service and Butterworth's Family Law Journal and author of a number of articles on family law.  He is co-editor of Family Law Policy in New Zealand, 2nd edition LexisNexis Butterworths 2002.  He is joint author of Family Law in New Zealand, 11th edition, LexisNexis Butterworths 2003.  He is the joint author of Relationship Property on Death (2004 Thomson Brookers) and sole author of Care of Children (2005 LexisNexis Butterworths). 

Professor Henaghan has published extensively both nationally and internationally in family law. Professor Henaghan has practical experience as well as being an academic.  He has large-scale involvement with the New Zealand Law Society and LexisNexis workshops and conferences.  He is frequently called on by practitioners for consultancy work right across the family law spectrum and is a consultant to the Law Commission.

Professor Henaghan is the Principal Investigator of the Human Genome Project which is funded by the New Zealand Law Foundation.  The three year research project aims to explore the legal, ethical and scientific implications of new human genome technologies.

Abstract

There are pockets of child poverty and child abuse in New Zealand.  Is this an issue that more government funding will cure?  Genetic medicine has the potential to do much good for the nation's health.  Should there be policy of accessibility to all or user pays to those advances in medicine?

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